Up-to-the-minute Advertising Restrictions by Google

Forewarned is forearmed. The main points of the Abusive Experience Report that will save the affiliate’s time, money and efforts.
Affiliate Valley Affiliate Valley 12 months ago 0 1082 7 min

Just recently, Google introduced Abusive Experience Report API which is an open-access free software interface. With its assistance, a user may get a full list of domains that in accordance with the report on the abusive experience contain violations. The API let developers create the applications directly interrelating with the Report. Before that, in January 2018 the restrictions were introduced in frames of Chrome Version 64. Chrome Version 74 dated 5 December allows blocking ads violating the rules. 

If a publisher places an advertising with the format or content that doesn’t meet the requirements Google will discipline the website. As a result, an unpredictable part of revenue may be lost.

To prevent that, we would like to give you the list of what is considered ‘Abusive Experience’ by Google. If you recognize your own advertising in some of the points we strongly request to reconsider it.

Fake Messages: Ads or other elements that resemble chat apps, warnings, system dialogs, or other notifications that lead to an ad or landing page when clicked.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Unexpected Click Areas: Transparent backgrounds, non-visible page elements, or other typically non-clickable areas that lead to an ad or landing page when clicked.

Misleading Site Behavior: Page features such as scroll bars, play buttons, “next” arrows, close buttons, or navigation links that lead to an ad or landing page when clicked.

Phishing: Ads or page elements that attempt to steal personal information or trick your users into sharing personal information.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Auto Redirect: Ads or page elements that auto-redirect the page without user action.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Mouse Pointer: Ads or page elements that resemble a moving or clicking mouse pointer that attempt to trick a user into interacting with it.

Malware or Unwanted Software: Ads or page elements that promote, host, or link to malware or unwanted software that may be installed on a users’ machine.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Ads with Missing or Misleading Branding: Ads that promote or depict unidentified or fictitious businesses. Examples include ads or other elements that are missing a company name, branding, and a logo — even if a generic description is included. This rule was added, then later removed by Google, however, this rule could still be enforced in the future. 

Additional rule for Native Advertising: The brand name/product name used in Native advertising must match the brand name/product name shown on the advertisement's landing page.

The conditions listed above relate to any content placed on your website regardless of whether or not it’s served from your domain. Further, we would like to give you a more detailed information on the factors that may cause blocking by Google. They are mostly related to banner and landing page content and/or format.  

The following misleading elements are not officially listed in the ‘Abusive Experience’ Web Tools but they may fall under this or that condition and as a result, decrease your profit. 

Misleading Branding: Banners or Landing Pages that promote or depict fictitious businesses. An example would be the reference of well-known brand names such as Facebook, Whatsapp, Snapchat, Tinder, etc used in marketing material as well as imitating the design, color schemes, logos and elements of these well-known brands. This is not only misleading but could be considered copyright and trademark infringement.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Missing Branding: Banner or Landing Pages that depict unidentified businesses. Any banner or landing page that does not clearly factually state the product name or brand name will have this label applied. This includes ads or other elements that are missing a company name, branding and/or a logo.

Misleading Mouse Pointer/Tap/Swipe Icons: Banner or Landing Page elements that resemble a moving or clicking mouse pointer, a tap or a swipe icon that attempts to trick the user into interaction with the ad.

Misleading Call To Action: Banner or Landing Page elements that depict a call to action that misleads a user into clicking the option and the action does not happen. Misleading Antivirus Alerts: Banner or Landing Page elements that resemble misleading statements, alert icons, alert colors that attempt to trick the user into believing that they have an issue that needs fixing on their device which is not true.

Misleading Browser/System Alerts: Banner or Landing Page elements that resemble system dialogs, imitations of Windows, IOS, Android system alert notifications and other related elements.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Misleading Chat Request: Banner or Landing Page elements that resemble chat applications that mislead the user into believing that they are really being asked to chat to an individual when this request is fake.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Misleading Close/Cancel buttons: Banner or Landing Page elements that mislead users into clicking on options to close an ad when in fact the ad does not close at all. This includes buttons that say close, no, cancel or fake close X.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Misleading Download/Play buttons: Banner or Landing Page elements that mislead users into clicking on Play or Download buttons that do not perform the operation that they are intended to perform.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Misleading Video Players: Similar to the misleading Download/Play buttons regulation. Banner or Landing Page elements that depict or imitate a video player including play icons, timers, scrollbars but then mislead the user. For example, clicking to play a video when there is no actual video to play.

Advertising Restrictions by Google

Misleading Site Pagination: Banner or Landing Page elements that mislead users into clicking buttons that are fake and do not do as stated. This includes imitating page numbers typically found on Tube sites, navigation options, skip buttons, arrows that mislead a user into clicking on the ad.

Native Advertising Branding: The brand does not have to appear on the promotional image, but it must match the brand or product name on the landing page that the native ad’s URL leads to.

Advertising in the digital space can swallow almost everything. Nevertheless, it has its own restrictions. Better knowledge of them will prevent you from wasting time on struggles with moderators as well as will save your profit.

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